Mary warren characterization

Accuser and accused in the Salem witch trials Mary Ann Warren was the oldest accuser during the Salem witch trialsbeing 18 years old, when the trials began. The fact that Mary also seems to really believe in witchcraft reveals how deeply ingrained in people the nonsensical belief in witchcraft the Communist threat is.

The trial is based on hatred and revenge, resulting in the condemning and execution of innocent villagers. Her life after the trials is unknown. Girls [raising their fists]: Stop it!! Warren told them she felt better now and could tell the difference between reality and visions.

Mary warren characterization

John Proctor told her she was just seeing his shadow, and put her to work at the spinning wheel, threatening to beat her if she pretended to have any more fits. Warren was kept hard at work at the Proctor home and was told that if she ran into fire or water during one of her fits, she would not be rescued. Mary was there when Abigail got Tituba to put a curse on Elizabeth, and she also knows about Abigail's affair with John Proctor. Later still in the play, Abigail accuses Proctor of witchcraft, and manages to convince Mary Warren to revoke her confession. She attempts to stand up to her main pressure, Abigail Williams, in the crucial court scene in Act III, but her lack of resolve undermines this effort and leads to the climax. She asserts the fact that she helped protect Goody Proctor from being arrested in an attempt to undermine the existing social hierarchy. The first sign we see of Mary's guilty conscience is when she makes a poppet a doll for Elizabeth Proctor, whom she currently keeps house for. However this power is superficial. It is also a good example of how many people respond under the real pressure of the Communist Witch Hunts in s America: under threat and in fear of imprisonment, people side with those that they know to be wrong to avoid the condemnation of the rest of society. Renouncing her claims after being threatened to be hanged, she was later arrested for allegedly practicing witchcraft herself, but did not confess. Proctor manages to convince her to reveal that she and the other accusers have been fabricating their stories and "supernatural experiences" that have resulted in the arrest of many innocents. I cannot do it, I cannot! Mary Warren is a character of weak determination who allows herself to be bullied constantly. The interaction is ridiculous and also extremely childish, with the screaming, stomping of feet and the back and forth repetition.

She is also a torn and confused character, like Hale, trying to figure out what is true and what is false amongst all the hysteria. That night, Warren stated that John Proctor woke her to torment her about posting the note.

Mary warren quotes

That night, Warren stated that John Proctor woke her to torment her about posting the note. Firstly, the fact that Mary Warren gets so involved in this interaction with the girls shows how deeply the hysteria appears to be engrained in her mind. This further highlights how deeply the hysteria runs, as Mary Warren has become so consumed by it she is seeing things that aren't actually there. This is probably because she was too scared to join in, tbh. The first sign we see of Mary's guilty conscience is when she makes a poppet a doll for Elizabeth Proctor, whom she currently keeps house for. The interaction confuses and scares her, which leads to her immature actions of shouting and stomping her feet. Warren told them she felt better now and could tell the difference between reality and visions. She was formally accused of witchcraft on April 18, She never seems to be fully confident in herself or what she is saying, which again highlights the extent of the hysteria in Salem. Mary acknowledges the corruption, and with outside influence, she is able to follow her truthful instincts. Some took her answers to their questions to mean that the girls had lied. I cannot, I cannot-" Both the quotation and stage direction emphasize Mary Warren's meek character.

She is not an evil person, but her weak will combined with her desire to be someone in the Salem community forces her into a situation in which she does harm to other people.

This emphasizes her childish nature, as it could be said that she seems to be avoiding the blame as best she can by constantly changing her statements.

Mary warren hysteria

I cannot, I cannot-" Both the quotation and stage direction emphasize Mary Warren's meek character. When clearly innocent people begin to be convicted, however, Mary feels bad about the whole thing. It could be that he's pointing out how even good-hearted people can commit destructive acts when swept up in mass hysteria like the Witch Trials or McCarthyism and the Red Scare. After arduous consideration, Mary decides to confess to the fallacious witch trials. Firstly, the fact that Mary Warren gets so involved in this interaction with the girls shows how deeply the hysteria appears to be engrained in her mind. Proctor manages to convince her to reveal that she and the other accusers have been fabricating their stories and "supernatural experiences" that have resulted in the arrest of many innocents. The hysterical reaction of Mary Warren exaggerates the situation, making it obvious to the audience that she truly believes in the witchcraft. It also again shows how deeply the hysteria is engrained in her mind, as she is able to completely reverse her statement so quickly.

Later still in the play, Abigail accuses Proctor of witchcraft, and manages to convince Mary Warren to revoke her confession. Mary Warren has a very weak character, giving in to pressure a number of times.

How is mary warren portrayed in the crucible

That night, Warren stated that John Proctor woke her to torment her about posting the note. This interaction between Mary Warren and the girls is a clear example of both the extent to which hysteria appears to have engrained itself in society, but also of Mary Warren's childish nature. This is conveyed through her subservient nature. Some took her answers to their questions to mean that the girls had lied. The trial is based on hatred and revenge, resulting in the condemning and execution of innocent villagers. However, Mary feels threatened to speak out against wicked Abigail. She is similar to Hale, in that she has good intentions but is merely misinformed about the events that are occurring in Salem.

Mary Warren is a very weak person in the play, who gives in to pressure a number of times. She doesn't seem to be able to think for herself, always needing the approval of another firstly Abigail, and now Proctor.

mary warren monologue

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